Site items in: Content by Author Oscar Pearce

Egypt launches new hydrogen incentives
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The Egyptian Parliament has ratified an incentive package for renewable hydrogen producers, aiming to pave the way for a rapid expansion of the sector. The incentives range from tax concessions to administrative streamlining and will seek to create an attractive investment climate. Egypt is well-located to play a leading role in meeting European demand for hydrogen exports. It is not alone in this ambition, however. Similar schemes have been launched by countries such as Oman.

COP28 Debrief: Flagship Hydrogen Initiatives Launched
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A series of flagship hydrogen initiatives were launched at COP28 last month. The initiatives are headlined by a 37-country joint declaration on mutual recognition of certification schemes, a response to sustained calls for increased global regulatory consistency. Additionally, the new ISO methodology for calculating hydrogen emissions was unveiled, paving the way for harmonisation.

“A common vision”: Germany forge new ties for hydrogen imports with the Netherlands, Africa
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Germany and the Netherlands have forged a groundbreaking new hydrogen partnership, doubling down on their common vision of a thriving European green hydrogen import market. The countries have announced a joint H2Global tender worth €600 million launching in 2024, as well as a plan to develop cross-border hydrogen infrastructure. Also this month, a new €4 billion commitment to Africa from Germany will act as the “starting signal” for deeper cooperation on hydrogen & renewable energy. Meanwhile, a recent Fraunhofer ISE study provides key insights into the export markets that are best equipped to meet this new demand.

Certification with blockchain: H2Global makes the case
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In a new policy brief, H2Global sets out the case for the use of blockchain in hydrogen certification. The use of a decentralised, digital, public ledger for key certification data could support the development of radically transparent and secure schemes, though H2Global acknowledges blockchain’s key limitations. To illustrate its potential, H2Global points to the success of two currently operating schemes based on blockchain: “GreenToken” and “Clean Energy Certification as a service” (CEC).

Certification 101: New Hydrogen Council Report
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Hydrogen Certification 101, the Hydrogen Council’s new report, provides a helpful summary of key certification terminology and concepts. It is the latest report to advocate for mutual recognition as a solution to inconsistency in energy policy, while also delving into practical measures to support the fundamental design principles of certification schemes.

Maritime book & claim system: a new tool in the decarbonisation of shipping
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The Mærsk Mc-Kinney Møller Center for Zero Carbon Shipping (MMCZCS), RMI, Danish Shipping, and Maersk Oil Trading have released two publications outlining their new Maritime Book & Claim system, which will undergo a pilot later this year. Under the system, ships will be able to ‘book’ emissions associated with individual voyages, which consumers can then ‘claim’. The system seeks to accelerate decarbonisation by empowering green shipping services to find customers offering green premiums, regardless of geographical constraints.

Scrap “green” and “blue” hydrogen, use emissions intensity instead: new IEA report
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The International Energy Agency has proposed a new taxonomy for hydrogen definitions based on emissions intensity, moving away from color labels. In Towards hydrogen definitions based on their emissions intensity, the IEA proposes a set of nine distinct, technology-neutral emissions intensity bands. The report also advocates for an international approach to ensure interoperability between certification schemes, and suggests that a mutual recognition approach based on the IPHE’s emissions methodology is the best way forward.

UK government releases plans for low-carbon hydrogen certification scheme
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The UK government has released a consultation paper outlining its current position on several certification dilemmas, as it works towards launching a fully functioning low-carbon hydrogen certification scheme before 2025. The paper grapples with challenging design choices including chain of custody and scheme participation while emphasising the importance of international collaboration and interoperability.

Current certification gaps hindering development of a global market: new IRENA report
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IRENA and RMI’s new report Creating a global hydrogen market: Certification to enable trade concludes that there are significant gaps and conflicts in current certification schemes. Inconsistent labelling thresholds, accounting boundaries, and production pathways are the main areas of concern. The report offers several recommendations to support the harmonisation of certification frameworks, warning that schemes cannot continue to develop in a “patchwork” manner.